Axolotl Content

Visit Brutle.com for a lot of interesting stuff. Just today I'm uploading a LOT of Axolotl content in a hugely Video format. All the clicking has been done for you and the videos are the best of the best. 

I hope you like it. 

http://www.brutle.com

Axolotl: Not a Little But a Lottle

Axolotls are a mix between a Pokemon, the Dragon from “How To Train a Dragon” and well, that. Cute and adorable. Interesting and now, coming out in more and more great colors and sizes.

Axolotls are the “neotinic” form of Salamanders. The form BEFORE they drop their gills and become salamanders. They’re laid as eggs in a mucinous egg mass not unlike a mess of frog eggs. There may be hundreds and even thousands.

They hatch out and immediately start eating freshly hatched Brine Shrimp and other tiny live food. A good breeder can keep the water clean and preserve a LARGE percentage of the brood.

The parents don’t take any care of the babies. I’ll post another article soon about how the Axolotls actually “breed” which, too, is pretty impersonal.

Have you seen the Axolotls of Georgia Facebook Page? 

You might also like my Youtube Channel linked below.

I’m just starting to keep Axolotls as pets and I will share my experiences on these as I go. Right now I just love the way they move around, and how smart they seem to be. At feeding time they brighten up and approach the front of their enclosure and their babies are simply adorable.

Dr Erik Johnson

Renal Disease in Dogs: TUMS?

Kidney Failure in Dogs

How to Improve the Survival of Dogs With Kidney Failure

Hyperphosphataemia in patients with chronic kidney disease, particularly those on dialysis, can be ameliorated by oral phosphate binders in conjunction with dietary phosphate restriction.

Although phosphate binders reduce serum phosphate in these patients, it remains uncertain whether they improve clinical outcomes.

Calcium-based binders are frequently used, but their popularity is waning due to emerging evidence of accelerated vascular calcification.

The use of aluminium-based binders has been limited by a perceived risk of aluminium accumulation.

The non-calcium-based phosphate binders – sevelamer hydrochloride, lanthanum carbonate and sucroferric oxyhydroxide – have become available and subsidised by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme for patients on dialysis.

The pill burden and adverse effects (particularly gastrointestinal intolerance) associated with the expensive, non-calcium – non-aluminum phosphate binders (sevelamer ) often contribute to poor medication adherence.

Calcium carbonate is the most common form of phosphate binder prescribed, particularly in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease. It is typically given to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis. As with all phosphate binders, calcium-based binders are most effective when taken with meals (which also limits calcium absorption).10 They should be prescribed in conjunction with moderate dietary phosphate restriction, ideally supervised by an accredited practising dietitian. Phosphate-rich foods with a high phosphate to protein ratio (processed foods, fast foods and cola drinks) are best avoided, while foods with a high biologic value (e.g. meats and eggs) should be retained to maintain nutritional status.11,12

Calcium-containing phosphate binders
Calcium binders have historically been an appealing first choice, because they also address the hypocalcaemia that is often seen with hyperphosphataemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, hypercalcaemia and accelerated vascular calcification are the main concerns with calcium-containing phosphate binders, particularly when they are combined with vitamin D therapy.5,15-18 The Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative Guidelines suggest that doses should not exceed 1500 mg/day of elemental calcium,19 based on evidence that this produces a positive calcium balance (excess body stores of calcium leading to soft-tissue and vessel calcification) in chronic kidney disease.20 However, there is little evidence of patient outcomes to support this recommendation. Another common adverse effect of these drugs is gastrointestinal upset, particularly constipation. The other main advantage of calcium-based binders is that they are inexpensive.

Calcium-based binders were associated with significantly lower serum phosphate (mean difference 0.07 mmol/L) when compared with sevelamer. However, sevelamer was associated with a lower risk of hypercalcaemia (risk ratio 0.45, 95% CI* 0.35–0.59) and a higher risk of adverse gastrointestinal events (risk ratio 1.58, 95% CI 1.11–1.25). There was no difference in all-cause mortality between calcium-based binders and sevelamer.51

Phosphate binders therefore effectively reduce serum phosphate in patients with chronic kidney disease, but it is uncertain whether they improve clinical outcomes. There may be a mortality difference between calcium-based and non-calcium-based binders, but it is not clear if this reflects a harmful effect of calcium-based binders, a beneficial effect of non-calcium-based binders or both.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Excerpts from:     https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5313253/

What to Do About Cats Peeing Outside the Box

Cat Box Problems

Inappropriate Elimination in Cats

My Cat Pees Outside the Litter Pan

Cats that pee outside the litter pan may have a simple "issue" that is fixed by a very simple solution. A bigger litter pan. Did you know there was a study that revealed a 75+% successful method to get a cat to pee in its litter box again? Yeah it works. 

At Drjohnson.com there's an article that explains it all. There are FIVE Main Points to master and it's likely you'll fix the cat pee problem you're facing. 

Here's the link to Solving Cat Pee Problems in Two Easy Ways

Thanks

Doc Johnson

Disinfect Dog Mouths: Fight Infections

How to Improve or Fix Bad Breath In Dogs or 

How to Prevent Vegetative Endocardiosis (Bacterial Heart Valve Flap Disease) In Dogs

Infections Spreading from Mouth to Lungs and Heart in Dogs. 

Wow! I just found out Oxyfresh is available on Amazon! 

For oral infections: http://amzn.to/2E9iwCl

I've been recommending it to clients for literally YEARS except I've hesitated because it used to be a pyramid scheme behind the product. 
So how does it work and why?   

Well crust / tartar on the teeth comes from calcification (calcium hydroxyapetite) of the colonies of slime bacteria on the teeth. 
If you have slime bacteria, sooner than later you have plaque / tartar / crust. 
Well that's fine in dogs; because you can keep them in front of hard dental exercise which increases saliva, helps remove slime bacteria and can even mechanically chip away at tartar. 
In cats, not the same. 
Well anyway, enter Oxyfresh. It's basically good-tasting Listerine you can swallow. Great for pets for that very reason. They can drink it in their water, and it kills all their slime bacteria, hence, NO TARTAR, ever. 
Breath also improves A LOT. 
I recommend Oxyfresh for my older dogs to keep infections minimal. Especially older dogs who could be metabolically destabilized by a dental under anesthesia. 
But even for younger dogs, if you can eliminate the slime bacteria you do TWO things, first you improve breath and secondly, you short-circuit the formation of tartar. 

You can't drink Listerine! But with Oxyfresh they figured out a molecule with disinfectant properties that is instantly NEUTRALIZED by Hydrochloric acid in the stomach. 
So no gastrointestinal flora upset.

There is no substitute. Every year the drug reps come to the clinic with products that as "as good as Oxyfresh" and I've tried most of them, and they do not have the same molecule nor the same effect. Not even close. 

(We had a dog named Trudy that had fish breath and that's what worked. Exclusively. Even though we tried everything else available at the time)

Anyway, so now Oxyfresh is available easily at Amazon. Here's a link that makes me 0.12 cents a bottle lol

For oral infections: http://amzn.to/2E9iwCl